University of Alaska Fairbanks est. 1917

#biology

“In 2012, biologists at Denali National Park and Preserve noted a drop in wolf sightings following the death of a breeding female from a pack that lived along the Denali Park Road. This was one of several instances where the death of an individual wolf from legal trapping or hunting sparked widespread attention in recent years.
“This isn’t the first time we have noticed that the loss of a breeding wolf can affect the fate of the pack. We thought it would be valuable to systematically look at what happens to the pack and population following the death of a breeder,” said author Bridget Borg, a University of Alaska Fairbanks biology graduate student and National Park Service biologist.” [X]
“In 2012, biologists at Denali National Park and Preserve noted a drop in wolf sightings following the death of a breeding female from a pack that lived along the Denali Park Road. This was one of several instances where the death of an individual wolf from legal trapping or hunting sparked widespread attention in recent years.
“This isn’t the first time we have noticed that the loss of a breeding wolf can affect the fate of the pack. We thought it would be valuable to systematically look at what happens to the pack and population following the death of a breeder,” said author Bridget Borg, a University of Alaska Fairbanks biology graduate student and National Park Service biologist.” [X]

In 2012, biologists at Denali National Park and Preserve noted a drop in wolf sightings following the death of a breeding female from a pack that lived along the Denali Park Road. This was one of several instances where the death of an individual wolf from legal trapping or hunting sparked widespread attention in recent years.

“This isn’t the first time we have noticed that the loss of a breeding wolf can affect the fate of the pack. We thought it would be valuable to systematically look at what happens to the pack and population following the death of a breeder,” said author Bridget Borg, a University of Alaska Fairbanks biology graduate student and National Park Service biologist.” [X]

I am Tim Mullet, a Ph.D. Candidate in the Biology and Wildlife Department at UAF working under Falk Huettmann. My research focus is to determine how snowmachine activity affects wildlife, the soundscape, and vegetation in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge.
These findings are helpful for wildlife managers to make informed decisions when dealing with human disturbance and natural resources. Winter field seasons are cold, dark, and long.
Much of my field work lasts from November to April. However, the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge offers spectacular landscapes that make days of data collection in 20 below temperatures worth it. [X]
I am Tim Mullet, a Ph.D. Candidate in the Biology and Wildlife Department at UAF working under Falk Huettmann. My research focus is to determine how snowmachine activity affects wildlife, the soundscape, and vegetation in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge.
These findings are helpful for wildlife managers to make informed decisions when dealing with human disturbance and natural resources. Winter field seasons are cold, dark, and long.
Much of my field work lasts from November to April. However, the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge offers spectacular landscapes that make days of data collection in 20 below temperatures worth it. [X]
I am Tim Mullet, a Ph.D. Candidate in the Biology and Wildlife Department at UAF working under Falk Huettmann. My research focus is to determine how snowmachine activity affects wildlife, the soundscape, and vegetation in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge.
These findings are helpful for wildlife managers to make informed decisions when dealing with human disturbance and natural resources. Winter field seasons are cold, dark, and long.
Much of my field work lasts from November to April. However, the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge offers spectacular landscapes that make days of data collection in 20 below temperatures worth it. [X]

I am Tim Mullet, a Ph.D. Candidate in the Biology and Wildlife Department at UAF working under Falk Huettmann. My research focus is to determine how snowmachine activity affects wildlife, the soundscape, and vegetation in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge.

These findings are helpful for wildlife managers to make informed decisions when dealing with human disturbance and natural resources. Winter field seasons are cold, dark, and long.

Much of my field work lasts from November to April. However, the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge offers spectacular landscapes that make days of data collection in 20 below temperatures worth it. [X]